Bereavement

If you have experienced the death of someone who was very important to you, you might be finding it very difficult to adjust to the immense changes happening in your life right now. Grief can shake everything up – your beliefs, your personality, and even your sense of reality.

psychotherapist wimbledon sw19Bereavement is the time we spend adjusting to loss. There is no standard time limit and there is no right or wrong way to feel during the bereavement period – everyone must learn to cope in their own way.

Grief, although normal, can manifest in a huge range of unexpected ways. Some people get angry, some people withdraw further into themselves and some people become completely numb. Sometimes, grief can turn into something more serious – like depression.

The bereavement period can be a confusing time involving a lot of very powerful emotions. These emotions can grow, fade and shift as we move across the different stages of bereavement. Not everyone experiences the same stages of bereavement at the same time or in the same order.

Different emotions associated with grief include: 

  • Sorrow
  • longing (to see them again)
  • guilt
  • numbness
  • anger
  • hopelessness
  • loneliness
  • despair.

What you feel after a person has died will depend on the relationship you had with that person and the nature of their death. Of course, there is no telling what form your grief will take, and everyone’s experience is unique.

As painful as it feels, it is important to let yourself grieve for your loss. Some people lock their emotions inside and try to get on with life as usual. Denying yourself the time to grieve properly could result in complications that prevent you from getting on with life. Sometimes grief can be so powerful it can lead to:

  • Not wanting or feeling able to get out of bed.
  • Neglecting yourself – not taking care of your hygiene or appearance.
  • Not eating properly.
  • The feeling that you can’t carry on living without the person you’ve lost.
  • Not feeling able to go to work.
  • Taking your feelings out on other people.

All of these reactions are normal parts of bereavement – unless they go on for a very long time. If you feel like you are no longer coping with grief very well, you may need some extra help from a bereavement counsellor.

I am a psychotherapist in Wimbledon SW19.  If you are seeking psychotherapy in Wimbledon SW19 please call me Lisa on 0203 128 7755

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